CMRS Lecture: Mark Rankin (James Madison University) - "Accuracy and 'Error' in the Production of John Foxe and John Day's Acts and Monuments"

Image
Image of Mark Rankin - COURTESY OF MERTON COLLEGE LIBRARY, OXFORD
October 1, 2021
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Location
340 18th Ave. Library (Colloquia Space)

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2021-10-01 16:00:00 2021-10-01 17:30:00 CMRS Lecture: Mark Rankin (James Madison University) - "Accuracy and 'Error' in the Production of John Foxe and John Day's Acts and Monuments" Please join us for this first entry in our 2021-2022 Lecture Series, the inaugural Dr. John N. King Lecture in Medieval and Renaissance Studies! This event, as with all the lectures in our annual series, is free and open to the public. To RSVP for in-person attendance, please visit https://cmrs.osu.edu/events/2021-2022-in-person-rsvp-form. To watch livestream on Facebook, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/217360930440120/. **Rescheduled from April 26** Abstract: Current knowledge of the problems faced during production of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments in the printing house of John Day, the Elizabethan printer, is based upon the pioneering research of Julian Roberts, with revision and expansion by John N. King, Elizabeth Evenden, and Thomas S. Freeman. This lecture responds to these scholars by focusing upon Day’s approach to the correction of error, especially through his use of slip-cancels, tiny scraps of paper which are intended for pasting over erroneous text, as well as his use of stop-press correction and the labeling of the book’s well-known woodcuts. I will suggest ways in which the bibliographical nature of successive editions of Foxe’s book overseen by Day is even more complex than previously described, and I will demonstrate in particular the nature of Day’s commitment to producing an accurate text. The argument adds to scholarly understanding of the goals and methodologies of both Foxe and Day. Bibliographical fluidity associated with John Day’s approach to error during production points toward the better understanding of textual fluidity within successive editions of Foxe’s work. Bio: Dr. Mark Rankin regularly teaches and has published widely on Tudor literature, English Reformation literature and culture, and the early English Bible.  He is contributing editor of Sermons at Paul's Cross, 1521-1642 (Oxford, 2017) and co-editor of Henry VIII and His Afterlives: Literature, Politics, and Art (Cambridge, 2009). He is currently completing a new census of surviving copies of the first four editions of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments of these Latter and Perilous Days, and his critical edition of William Tyndale's The Practice of Prelates (1530) is under contract with Catholic University of America Press. He is the Principal Investigator of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Scholarly Editions and Translations Grant, 2016-19, on “The Independent Works of William Tyndale,” and has co-directed NEH Summer Seminars for College and University Teachers on "Tudor Books and Readers: 1485-1603" and "The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650.” He has held short-term research fellowships at the Newberry Library, the Huntington Library, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, and was Faculty Member in Residence for JMU's Semester in London Program during the autumn of 2013.  His articles have appeared in Renaissance Quarterly, English Literary Renaissance, Erasmus Studies, the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, The Library, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, Reformation, Studies in English Literature, The Yearbook of English Studies, and The Sixteenth Century Journal. He regularly offers presentations at the Renaissance Society of America's annual meeting, and at the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference. He is a member of the Bibliographical Society and the Renaissance English Text Society. This event will be presented with automated closed captions through the Facebook Live stream. If you wish to request traditional CART services or other accommodations, please contact cmrs@osu.edu. Requests made by about 10 days before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date. Effective Aug. 2, students, faculty, staff and visitors to all Ohio State campuses and medical facilities are required to wear masks indoors, regardless of their vaccination status. Masks continue to be required outdoors for unvaccinated individuals when they cannot maintain physical distancing. Vaccinated people are not required to mask outdoors. 340 18th Ave. Library (Colloquia Space) Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies cmrs@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Please join us for this first entry in our 2021-2022 Lecture Series, the inaugural Dr. John N. King Lecture in Medieval and Renaissance Studies! This event, as with all the lectures in our annual series, is free and open to the public. To RSVP for in-person attendance, please visit https://cmrs.osu.edu/events/2021-2022-in-person-rsvp-form. To watch livestream on Facebook, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/217360930440120/.

**Rescheduled from April 26**


Abstract: Current knowledge of the problems faced during production of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments in the printing house of John Day, the Elizabethan printer, is based upon the pioneering research of Julian Roberts, with revision and expansion by John N. King, Elizabeth Evenden, and Thomas S. Freeman. This lecture responds to these scholars by focusing upon Day’s approach to the correction of error, especially through his use of slip-cancels, tiny scraps of paper which are intended for pasting over erroneous text, as well as his use of stop-press correction and the labeling of the book’s well-known woodcuts. I will suggest ways in which the bibliographical nature of successive editions of Foxe’s book overseen by Day is even more complex than previously described, and I will demonstrate in particular the nature of Day’s commitment to producing an accurate text. The argument adds to scholarly understanding of the goals and methodologies of both Foxe and Day. Bibliographical fluidity associated with John Day’s approach to error during production points toward the better understanding of textual fluidity within successive editions of Foxe’s work.

Bio: Dr. Mark Rankin regularly teaches and has published widely on Tudor literature, English Reformation literature and culture, and the early English Bible.  He is contributing editor of Sermons at Paul's Cross, 1521-1642 (Oxford, 2017) and co-editor of Henry VIII and His AfterlivesLiterature, Politics, and Art (Cambridge, 2009). He is currently completing a new census of surviving copies of the first four editions of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments of these Latter and Perilous Days, and his critical edition of William Tyndale's The Practice of Prelates (1530) is under contract with Catholic University of America Press.

He is the Principal Investigator of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Scholarly Editions and Translations Grant, 2016-19, on “The Independent Works of William Tyndale,” and has co-directed NEH Summer Seminars for College and University Teachers on "Tudor Books and Readers: 1485-1603" and "The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650.” He has held short-term research fellowships at the Newberry Library, the Huntington Library, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, and was Faculty Member in Residence for JMU's Semester in London Program during the autumn of 2013. 

His articles have appeared in Renaissance QuarterlyEnglish Literary RenaissanceErasmus Studies, the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern StudiesThe LibraryTransactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, ReformationStudies in English LiteratureThe Yearbook of English Studies, and The Sixteenth Century Journal. He regularly offers presentations at the Renaissance Society of America's annual meeting, and at the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference. He is a member of the Bibliographical Society and the Renaissance English Text Society.


This event will be presented with automated closed captions through the Facebook Live stream. If you wish to request traditional CART services or other accommodations, please contact cmrs@osu.edu. Requests made by about 10 days before the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date.

Effective Aug. 2, students, faculty, staff and visitors to all Ohio State campuses and medical facilities are required to wear masks indoors, regardless of their vaccination status. Masks continue to be required outdoors for unvaccinated individuals when they cannot maintain physical distancing. Vaccinated people are not required to mask outdoors.