Current and Recent Courses

PDF icon PDF icon PDF icon PDF icon

CMRS Affiliated Courses (medieval and Renaissance offerings from other departments)

MEDREN Courses

CMRS Individual Studies

 


CMRS Affiliated Courses

 

PDF icon Spring 2019 CMRS Affiliated Courses.pdf

 


 

Spring 2019 MEDREN Courses

 

MEDREN 2215 - Gothic Paris 1100-1300

Eloisa_and_Abelard E Fortescue Brickdale

Description: The arts, architecture, poetry, history, music, theology, food, and fashion of Paris in 1100-1300, the age of Gothic cathedrals and the birth of the university. 

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Medieval 215. GE culture and ideas and diversity global studies course.

Paris became a center for learning, beauty, power, and shopping in the High Middle Ages. Discover the first Gothic cathedrals, Courtly Love, King Arthur’s justice, and the love affair between the philosopher Abelard and his gifted student Heloise in the age of the birth of the university. Explore the streets of Paris and its monuments through readings, films, interactive web maps, and hands-on experiences. Assignments: midterm & final exam (multiple choice), short quizzes, and a short research project on experiencing something related to medieval Paris. 

Class: 33161

Time: TuTh 2:20PM-3:40PM

Room: Scott Lab E040

Instructor: Sarah-Grace Heller

 

MEDREN 2618 - Travel and Exploration

Cantino_planisphere_(1502)

Description: In this course we will explore narratives of travel and intercultural contact—not only victorious accounts of discovery and conquest, but also tales of failed expeditions, shipwreck, and captivity—produced by some of the main competitors in European imperial expansion: the Portuguese, Spanish and English.  We will study the relationship between literature and empire as we examine how such narratives shaped Europeans’ perceptions of their own and other cultures, and how the texts reflect, implement, and/or challenge imperial and colonial discourses. This course examines intercultural contact between Europe (Spain, Portugal, and England) and the 'New Worlds' through early modern narratives of travel, conquest,  shipwreck, and captivity.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Medieval 218. GE culture and ideas and diversity global studies course.

Class: 32895

Time: WeFr 11:10AM-12:30PM

Room: Mendenhall Lab 174

Instructor: Lisa Voigt

 

MEDREN 5695 - Advanced Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies: Little Ice Age

 

Description: This course will explore the human experience of climatic changes and extremes from the Great Famine of the 1310s to the famous “Year without a Summer” in 1816.  We’ll start by examining how scientists and historians have reconstructed past climate, and how they have explained its impact on agriculture, health, and economic and political history.  However, the real emphasis of the course will be how ordinary people lived through the Little Ice Age: their perceptions, experiences, and memories of climatic changes and extremes.  We’ll approach this topic through case studies of historical events, as well as theater, art, and literature.  We’ll draw on examples from across the world over a wide range of time, but with a focus on Europe and particularly England ca.1560-1620.  Throughout this course we’ll discuss how past experiences of natural climate change can (and can’t) help us understand the experience of anthropogenic global warming in the present century.

Class: 26030

Time: We 2:15PM-5:00PM

Room: University Hall 024

Instructor: Samuel White

 

MEDREN 7899, "Medieval and Renaissance Colloquia"

Description: This course consists of 1 credit hour per semester for attending CMRS lectures, faculty colloquia and subsequent discussions or preceding "open forum" events. This will amount to: 4 1-hour+ CMRS lectures by visiting professors and at least 1 internal lecture, plus subsequent (or preceding) discussion sessions (total = approx. 3 hours per event); at least one lunch with visiting faculty member (2 hours); active involvement with MRGSA and its activities; and meetings with the Center director (one hour once per term). With permission of the Director other professional activities (e.g. attendance at appropriate conferences, on or off campus; other relevant lectures hosted by OSU units if CMRS colloquia are not scheduled) may be substituted.

Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 3 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

Class: 9247*

Time: Fri 4:00PM - 6:00PM

Room: TBA

Instructor: TBD

 


CMRS Individual Studies

 

MEDREN 4193, 8193 – Individual Studies

Description: Students may register for individual directed study under this number for work not normally offered in courses.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs or 3 completions. This course is graded S/U.

 

MEDREN 4998, 4998H, 4999, and 4999 - Undergraduate Research and Thesis Hours

If interested in enrolling in individual studies or research/thesis hours, please contact CMRS Associate Director and Student Advisor, Professor Leslie Lockett.

 

For more information about the Center’s Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization and Graduate Certificate programs, please visit this page.

*Enrollment open to graduate students, undergraduate students only with permission from the Center and the Graduate School. Attendance based upon lecture series schedule; see the CMRS Events webpage for more information.

[pdf] - Some links on this page are to Adobe .pdf files requiring Adobe Reader.  If you need these files in a more accessible format, please contact cmrs@osu.edu.

 

0