Calls for Papers & Other Notable Deadlines

 


Please submit your calls for papers, event postings, or inquiries to cmrs_gaa@osu.edu.

 

Submission Deadlines :

September  October  November  December  January  February  March  April  May  June  July August


September 2018 Deadlines

Folger Institute: "Before Farm to Table" semester-long fellowships: $10K. Part of the inaugural project of the Mellon Initiative in Collaborative Research at the Folger. Due Sept. 1.

 
Playing the Past: Race, Gender, and Heroism in Gaming (A Roundtable)
Video and PC gaming have come to play a substantial role in popular consciousness in the 21st century and the medium itself offers a uniquely immersive experience unfathomable in other facets of popular culture. In virtual “medieval” and fantasy worlds, a player gets the chance to live the story rather than being a passive observer, and in MMORPGs like World of Warcraft, he or she can even relate to other players as that character, experiencing the world as priest or paladin existing in an expansive virtual space. However, the interactive nature of these games also raises important questions about how we conceptualize and create the past and the impact these imagined worlds can have on notions of the “medieval” for a non-academic audience.
 
 Often these games leave women behind in the role of damsels in distress, drawing from modern conceptions of “medieval” chivalric codes that do not make space for female adventurers and heroes. Moreover, race often refers to various humanoid creatures like trolls and goblins, and these fantasy “races” are often included in lieu of real racial and ethnic diversity on the grounds that fantasy creatures are somehow “more medieval.” When a developer chooses to include women or people of color in their “medieval” video game, alt-right gamer movements like Gamergate have resisted, claiming the game has become “ahistorical” by allowing anyone but white men into their pseudo-medieval fantasy. This roundtable will raise questions about how the past has been used in gaming to alienate non-white, non-male players, and the extent to which gaming developers have managed to resist medievalist tropes as held in popular consciousness.
 
 Each participant will give a 7-10-minute presentation, which will be followed by a roundtable discussion. Possible topics can include but are not limited to constructions of the past in video game medievalisms, problematic uses of race and gender in fantasy gaming, and the mobilization of faux medievalism against inclusivity by online movements like Gamergate. Please submit a 200 word abstract to Ali Frauman at afrauman@indiana.edu by September 15th, 2018 and direct any questions to the same address. Thank you!
 

October 2018 Deadlines

 


November 2018 Deadlines

The Fourteenth Marco Manuscript Workshop will take place Friday and Saturday, February 1-2, 2019, at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The workshop is organized by Professors Maura K. Lafferty (Classics) and Roy M. Liuzza (English), and is hosted by the Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

For this year’s workshop, we invite papers on the theme “Bits and Pieces.” Some manuscripts have survived the centuries bright, pristine, majestic, and complete; most have suffered at least some minor damage or loss; some manuscripts, however, seem no more than ragged scraps. They lack beginnings, or endings, or middles; they tantalize with their incompleteness. These fragments still have much to tell us, though they make us work to learn it. The reader of incomplete manuscripts and fragments faces a broad array of problems – how to extrapolate missing text, how to fill the gaps in a page or a text, how to read a faded and worn leaf, how to combine dispersed fragments into a whole, how to represent the fragment in a modern edition in a way that renders it legible while still acknowledging its brokenness. Some fragments are already repaired, either bound into florilegia, rewritten by a well-meaning early reader, or patched and glued and restored in ways that sometimes obscure as much as they preserve; in such cases the modern reader may have to deconstruct an earlier reader’s traces before reconstructing the original text. The problems and rewards of studying manuscript fragments, large and small, are many; we welcome presentations on any aspect of this topic, broadly imagined.

The workshop is open to scholars and graduate students in any field who are engaged in textual editing, manuscript studies, or epigraphy. Individual 75-minute sessions will be devoted to each project; participants will be asked to introduce their text and its context, discuss their approach to working with their material, and exchange ideas and information with other participants. As in previous years, the workshop is intended to be more like a class than a conference; participants are encouraged to share new discoveries and unfinished work, to discuss both their successes and frustrations, to offer both practical advice and theoretical insights, and to work together towards developing better professional skills for textual and codicological work. We particularly invite the presentation of works in progress, unusual manuscript problems, practical difficulties, and new or experimental models for studying or representing manuscript texts. Presenters will receive a $500 honorarium for their participation.

The deadline for applications is November 2, 2018. Applicants are asked to submit a current CV and a two-page letter describing their project to Roy M. Liuzza, preferably via email to rliuzza@utk.edu, or by mail to the Department of English, University of Tennessee, 301 McClung Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996-0430.

The workshop is also open at no cost to scholars and students who do not wish to present their own work but are interested in sharing a lively weekend of discussion and ideas about manuscript studies. Further details will be available later in the year; please contact Roy Liuzza or the Marco Institute at marco@utk.edu for more information.

 


December 2018 Deadlines

 


January 2019 Deadlines

 


February 2019 Deadlines

 


March 2019 Deadlines

 


April 2019 Deadlines

 


May 2019 Deadlines

 


June 2018 Deadlines

 


July 2018 Deadlines

 


August 2018 Deadlines

The Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Durham University (IMEMS) is a sponsor of the Renaissance Society of America Conference which next year will be held on 17 – 20 March 2019 in Toronto. 

As an associate organisation of the RSA, IMEMS is eligible to submit up to 4 sponsored panels, which will automatically be accepted by the RSA.

We invite panel submissions by Monday 6 August 2018. These should be sent to admin.imems@durham.ac.uk and copied to toby.osborne@durham.ac.uk, who is coordinating the conference on behalf of the Institute.

 

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